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would be -- so much fun. then he ran for the u.s. senate and told me to go off to law school. he said, you have been on enough losing campaigns in your life. then i went to law school and came back to new hampshire. i had had a big opening at a college that was all male for 200 years. i feel we have been forging our way, but luckily i had a governor shaheen, my mother, who mentored her, and i have been mentored by colleagues. i thing the opportunities are coming in abundance now. doors are open, law schools are more than 50% women. our class going into congress is the most diverse class ever, in all aspects. fascinating. so anyone younger than me, there are wide open opportunities. >> we all have a debt of gratitude to governor shaheen and senator ayotte for serving as attorney general. when my mother ran for congress, up 15% of voters would not even consider a woman candidate. when i think of the courage -- for the rest of us, now women on the ballot are very much accepted. >> i have to tell a story. susan used to tell the story about campaigning in that 1980 election. one time she w
year's to be signed into law. today is the 27. and so you have a few days left for lawmakers to make a deal. the president's should land at some point. there is a 5 hour time difference. they have to figure out something. it seems likely will go over the cliff. it has been looking like that before the holiday, but certainly now, particularly if you remember for congress broke for the christmas break, speaker raynor was not able to get the backup plan through his caucus, so there was no pressure on democrats to try to counter that immediately. senate democrats saying we passed a bill that raises tax rates on incomes over $250,000, we ran on this and this is what we are offering. house republicans were saying, no, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. someone is going to have to move. the question is, who? the president met with senate majority leader harry reid before going to hawaii and his offer was to extend the tax cuts for incomes under $250,000, extend unemployment insurance benefits, and the lady across -- and then delay the across the board automati
they want to bill, the infrastructure, the programs they make into law. guest: i think james hits on the virtue of a flat tax, having a low, single rate, getting rid of all the loopholes in the tax code and having the government learn to live within its means. that would take some time, but it is eminently doable with positive reforms on the entitlement for younger people. you do not have to change the benefit formulas for those on medicare or social security or who are about to go on those systems. as younger people know, those systems are headed for a crash. the sooner we reform them in a positive way, the better. the key to do it is not by raising taxes, but by having a low single rate and they learn to live within it. i think you'll have a much more prosperous country for it. host: let's end where we started. what do you think the best solution in your personal view and your business view is to the fiscal cliff situation? guest: aside from not doing something foolish and the next three or four days -- that is why i do not mind kicking the can down the road -- would be to follo
of law and military justice. we spend millions of dollars to work with the military during a wholesale way on mentor ship and to make sure that human rock -- human rights and the law are instilled drought. -- instill that throughout. >> and where you have seen efforts not working at all, where is it? is it the same? >> again, the challenges are paramount. these are forces that do not howff a great amount of discipline. they do not have great training. enda in many cases, they do not have great education. there is a capacity problem within the drc, and it makes it harder to try to train them up in a way that meets the standards that we would like to see in the military. >> would you like to comment further? gregg's yes, i would. -- >> yes, i would. i would like to say that security sector reform in the army has been a failure, for the most part. it is a failure because of all of things that my colleague has said, but is also a failure because of the elements appear of corruption. soldiers are not paid on a regular basis. they are not sustained and read what in the field -- and reequippe
the law, doctors and hospitals pushed back and said wait a minute, we need this compensation. therefore, we postponed it. every year we postponed, we had to come up with it from other sources. it is another one like field her native -- it is another one like the alternative minimum tax that has haunted us year in and year out. otherwise, what would have happened is, starting today, doctors and hospitals would have seen a reduction in their reimbursement by 20%. across the nation, many doctors and hospitals would have said we no longer can afford to treat these patients, and the americans who depend on medicare would have had fewer choices for treatment. we have resolved this for one year. another thing we have done that is critically important is extend unemployment benefits for one year. two million americans would have lost their unemployment benefits this morning as a result of this fiscal cliff if we had not taken action. it means an awful lot in illinois. we have literally tens of thousands in my own state that face the same basic problem. these are people who have been out of work
and rule of law, how open the business environment is. we know what is happening there. look at the frame work and applied it to the emerging markets. i am incredibly bullish for 2013 and the years ahead. places like africa -- compared to over 100% in places like greece and italy. these countries are not suffering from the leveraging problem. 60% of the emerging world is under the age of 25. over the to% in places like uganda. there are issues with youth employment. we are talking about 30% increases. opportunity for economic growth. things like political improvement in terms of democracy and freedoms. i have to have this debate with you, bill. countries like rwanda have been ranked number 1 by the world bank as the most improved. then the closed by telling you this. 90% of the world's population live in the emerging markets. they want to see improvements in their livelihoods. ir success is no longer hits to the global economy as a whole. there will be issues. i do think it will be bumpy. a number of countries are pivoting towards china. thank you very much. >> we have to talk about china
in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over l
trillion over ten years. here we are today, december 19, and these law changes which i referenced earlier, the end of the bush era tax cuts, the dreaded sequester, across the board cuts of $1.2 trillion in spending will begin to take effect the first of next year. the good news is the white house and republicans have been trading proposals and at least yesterday appeared to be moving closer together. i would have much preferred that they would be talking about a bigger package than they've discussed but nonetheless to reach a package that would resolve some of these issues would be an important step forward and i think help promote certainty that would be important to our economy. on the revenue side of the equation, i just want to remind you what it's taken in the past to balance the budget. we hear talk on average revenue is in the 18% of g.d.p. range n. getting back to average you will should be sufficient. the problem with that is we have never balanced the budget in the last 50 years based on 18% of g.d.p. in revenue. balancedtimes we've going back to 1969, you can see that revenue h
these laws. we pass appropriation bills and then it's the executive branch's responsibility to carry them out. how do we think we can pass these laws and then expect people to carry these laws out with efficiency and effectiveness when we take $100 billion out of their compensation? what kind of a message does that send to the people who serve us directly and all of the american people's interests in terms of their ultimate mission? it sends all the wrong message. now, i know people don't care much about the procedural issue, but, boy, you know, what a precedent to set. mr. issa: if the gentleman will yield? mr. moran: yes. mr. issa: it was posted last night which means it was posted before the cliff bill. the technical dropping is a different rule, but it was posted so it was available to all members last night. and, of course, as you know, it's a very simple -- we simply freeze, and that's not hard for people to understand. i hope the gentleman understands half percent freeze is all that this bill does. mr. moran: if the gentleman would yield 30 seconds he took to explain. you dropped it at
and the secretary of state to use measures already enacted into law under the comprehensive iran sanctions accountability and divestment act of 2010 to sanction iranian officials responsible for human rights violations against baha'is and others. mr. speaker, i was a co-author of that legislation and those measures are not here for show. they are there to punish those responsible for those egregious crime and to deter future human rights violations. it is therefore time for the administration to walk the walk and hold the iranian regime officials from the so-called supreme leader and ahmadinejad on down responsible for the violations of human rights of the baha'is and other iranians. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution, and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from florida reserves her time. the gentleman from florida, mr. engel, is recognized. mr. -- new york, mr. engel, is recognized. mr. engel: i rise in strong support of h.res. 134, as amended, and i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is reco
they cannot afford to repay. the national consumer law attorney took part in the discussion examining student loan debt and its effects on both the student and the parents. this is about an hour and 20 minutes. >> with a degree come student debt. i'm really happy to be here tonight. it is great to take some time, to have this many and this whole set up to discuss these things, and these issues. i think propublica does a fantastic job with this, as they do with everything. we are happy to have a fantastic panel with the array of experts you would want to be discussing this issue. marion has been covering this for propublica, and a month ago had a fantastic piece that would-be the result of months of investigation of the debt burden on parents. that is an aspect that not a lot of people have been talking about. although you may have read about it on the cover of the "new york times" today, a month ago is when she began talking about it. we have the publisher and author of a best seller called "secrets to winning a scholarship." next to him, an attorney with the national consumer law center and
it was originally located. so we dee authorized the canal and president bush signed into law my bill november 29, 1990. the second major piece of legislation i very proud of is the telecommunication act of 1996. i was on the conferee with the senate. i had many amendments involved with that, particularly with the broadcast side. it provides competition, reduced regulation, and started this whole innovation in our telecommunication industry, and it was a great honor for me to serve and to be contributing to that great bill which created all the new jobs in this country. the third one was the veterans millennium health care benefits act, was signed by brinbrin on march 10 -- president clinton on march 10, 2000. this bill was to provide extended care services for our veterans to make improvements in health care programs at the department of veterans affairs. i was chairman of the health subcommittee at the time and i was able to advance this bill and i'm very proud that president bill clinton signed this. the fourth bill was the cardiac arrest survival act of -- president clinton signed this on nov
energy, and it would care part of the obut ma health care law designed to allow millions of elderly and disabled get help at home. host: it sounds like you agree with some of the things in here but disagree with others. guest: yeah. and make no mistake, the work that was done enshrined some positive items and helped with the transition of unemployment insurance, the clean energy, as i said we're going to find things that were buried in it. it's no substitute for our taking a creeky, inefficient, unfair tax system and trying to broaden and make it more fair, get rid of the alternative minimum tax, get rid of this bizarre doc fix ritual go go -- we go through every year. this was the time to force those issues. and i fear that it's going to be harder in the new congress. guest: it's interesting, our tea party friends came to congress vowing that everybody would have 72 hours to read the bills. i didn't say anything about it on the floor last night but it's ironic. not one of them had read that bill. not one. there are some circumstances where there's a lot of boilerplate and complexit
about having had cancer themselves. kirtland changing experience. outpouring of law only understanding when compassion but these people bring their personal stories on his face would. and were you can fit information in a small space. 10 years ago the only choice was to send a press release and pray that everyone understood and instead i engaged in one of the most touching, deep interaction with my fan base people are saying i am sitting on the subway crying while reading your twitter feet. -- feed. there is a constant conversation. we could talk about this for hours. >> you end up with more faith in your fellow man. >> so much about this is everyone is able to share the possibility of that connection. >> the number of things we have to pay attention to has increased exponentially. >> you are on the train, you keep a rock star schedule. just keeping up with all these things wears me out. i am going to throw my phone in the leg. >> in the early days, people would say i do not have time for this, have more important work. i would say these things might -- save effort. it has changed the
defence everything and every value we stand for. freedom, human rights, rule of law, women rights, everything. last word. if you believe to the international prayer and the new books, i am the only -- the only one in the world who is taking part in operations. two were very successful. [applause] two were very successful and spared the world of nuclear weapons in the hands of dictators. the proliferation campaign, the international community must take care of. [applause] we look at all of us. [inaudible] [applause] >> there you see on display the discipline of an i.d.f. officer who always completes his mission. [laughter] regardless of the casualties. fareed zakaria, you're up next. final opening statement. >> thank you so much. i really understand the position of the opposing team. i understand the fear. i understand the danger. i understand the challenge. let me put this in some historical perspective. after the cold war the united states was the only country in the world with nuclear weapons and then the soviet union acquired a nuclear weapon. and there were many people who fel
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15